5 Comments

  1. Donovan
    19th May 2019 @ 7:19 am

    Okay, so the argument is basically “Rain-forests are in fact being cut down to cultivate soy, which is in fact causing harm to the planet, but it’s all the big bad carnivores’ fault”. The rest of this article seems to contradict the title, and the only real fresh take seems to be that vegans are purely innocent in the nonetheless-still-happening deforestation that results from soy plantations. Seems like removing the profit incentive from cutting down rain-forests, like some sort of severe “deforestation tax” would be much more efficient at saving the planet than pointing fingers at people who ingest flesh.

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    • Elise
      20th May 2019 @ 9:40 am

      Not exactly. First of all, soy products sold in Europe are made from soy that has been grown in the EU or Canada. Therefore, to eat soy here does not contribute to rain forests being cut down whatsoever. If you live elsewhere, then it is possible that your soy comes from a rain forest area. However, why would that be worse than other products that are grown in rain forest areas such as bananas and coconuts? Choosing to avoid soy seems rather random. In addition, if everyone would go vegan, we’d need less agricultural land than we’re currently using to feed everyone so there would be no need for deforestation and we could still provide everyone with soy burgers while still reforesting part of the previously destroyed rain forests.
      The main point is that about 90% of rain forest deforestation is for the production of meat, the majority to make space for cattle ranches and the rest for growing animal feed. A ‘deforestation tax’ could be useful, but that would only limit deforestation, while if everyone would go vegan that would just make deforestation completely redundant as we’d suddenly have much more available agricultural land than we could profitably use for the production of food and other products, therefore ending any incentive for deforestation other than possibly for the wood.

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  2. Sophie Forrester
    9th February 2019 @ 12:15 pm

    Exactly the info I was looking for! I make soy candles and my brother in law brought it to my attention that soy farming is destroying South America so I thought I would do some research. I think I will contact my wax supplier to see if they can tell me where their soy comes from. Thanks for the post!

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  3. Christian Engel
    9th October 2018 @ 12:46 am

    Why do you think that a meat free world would be beneficial to the rainforest? The South American farmers would quickly find other markets for their soya production, if they could no longer produce for meat agriculture. Why should they voluntarily give up their livelihood?The demand for soya products as a human nutrient is certain to rise instead, and other spinoff soya products will appear. We will get a powerful Soya lobby with dollars in its eyes. Making a product popular/politically correct is not a way of diminishing its production.

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    • Elise
      11th October 2018 @ 10:22 am

      First of all, soy plantations aren’t even the biggest incentive to cut down the rainforest in South America. An even bigger part of the newly created land is used for animal agriculture (so basically space to keep animals, mostly cows). If no one eats meat anymore, this land will no longer be used for that and can be used for other purposes or can be returned to nature. You are probably right that some of the soy framers would continue to grow soy for human consumption or other purposes. However, if everyone went vegan, we’d need much less agricultural land to feed everyone. There is no reason for farmers to produce tons and tons more food than our world population could possibly consume, so in a vegan world, there would be a whole lot of agricultural land that we would have to find a new purpose for, whether it’s to create non-food consumer goods or just giving it back to nature because farmers and investors will also realize that there’s little profit in large-scale overproduction. So I don’t think that’s much of a worry and even if these farmers would continue to grow the same amount of soy, then the environment would still be a whole lot better off than if we’d all continue to eat meat.

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